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harmj0y Posts

The Most Dangerous User Right You (Probably) Have Never Heard Of

I find Windows user rights pretty interesting. Separate from machine/domain object DACLs, user rights govern things like “by what method can specific users log into a particular system” and are managed under User Rights Assignment in Group Policy. Sidenote: I recently integrated privilege enumeration into PowerUp in the Get-ProcessTokenPrivilege function, with -Special returning ‘privileged’ privileges. SeEnableDelegationPrivilege One user right I overlooked, until Ben Campbell’s post on constrained delegation, was SeEnableDelegationPrivilege. This right governs whether a user account can “Enable computer and user accounts to be trusted for delegation.” Part of the reason I overlooked it is stated right in the…

S4U2Pwnage

Several weeks ago my workmate Lee Christensen (who helped develop this post and material) and I spent some time diving into Active Directory’s S4U2Self and S4U2Proxy protocol extensions. Then, just recently, Benjamin Delpy and Ben Campbell had an interesting public conversation about the same topic on Twitter. This culminated with Benjamin releasing a modification to Kekeo that allows for easy abuse of S4U misconfigurations. As I was writing this, Ben also published an excellent post on this very topic, which everyone should read before continuing. No, seriously, go read Ben’s post first. Lee and I wanted to write out our understanding…

Make PowerView Great Again

Yesterday’s commit to the PowerSploit dev branch is the biggest set of changes to PowerView since its inception. I’ve spent the last month or so rewriting PowerView from the ground up, squashing a number of bugs, adding a chunk of features, and standardizing the code base’s behavior. The commit message summarizes the modifications, but I wanted to spend some time detailing the massive set of changes. The previous PowerSploit Dev branch was merged into Master, and we will do a tagged release at some point next week. Note: this new PowerView code is definitely beta, but should be usable. I guarantee there are new bugs…

Kerberoasting Without Mimikatz

Just about two years ago, Tim Medin presented a new attack technique he christened “Kerberoasting“. While we didn’t realize the full implications of this at the time of release, this attack technique has been a bit of a game changer for us on engagements. More and more attention has been brought to Kerberoasting recently, with @mubix releasing a three part series on the topic, Sean Metcalf covering it several times, and @leonjza doing a detailed writeup as well. Thanks to an awesome PowerView pull request by @machosec, Kerberoasting is easier than ever using pure PowerShell. I wanted to briefly cover…

Empire Fails

Everyone makes mistakes, and we’re certainly no exception. Empire has suffered from a few security issues since its original release at BSides LV in 2015, and for a while, I’ve wanted to give some technical details on the specific mistakes we’ve made along the way for the sake of transparency. Thanks to a recent second disclosure by Spencer McIntyre (@zeroSteiner) several weeks ago, it seemed to be an appropriate time to own up to our transgressions. This post will cover the crypto issue disclosed right after release by Jon Cave (@joncave), as well as the two separate RCE issues disclosed by Spencer. Crypto…

The Empire Strikes Back

We recently made some of the biggest changes to Empire since its release at BSidesLV in 2015. This post will summarize many of the modifications for the Empire 2.0 beta release, but also check out @enigma0x3‘s and my “A Year in the Empire” presentation we gave at Derbycon 6 for more information (slides here). This also marks an expansion of the Empire Development Team, which now includes @enigma0x3, @sixdub, @rvrsh3ll, @xorrior, and @killswitch_gui. The beta code is current in the 2.0_beta branch of the newly-relocated Empire repository – we want to stress again that this code is beta, so use with…

Offensive Encrypted Data Storage

We generally try to keep off of disk as much as possible on engagements- there’s less to clean up and fewer chances of being caught. However, occasionally we have a need to store data on disk on a target system, and we want to try to do this in a secure way in case any incident responders start to catch on. Examples would be reboot-persistent keyloggers, something that monitors locations for specific files and clones/exfiltrates them, and the pilfering of KeePass files (see the Example: KeePass + EncryptedStore section below). If we have to write a file to disk, we…

Command and Control Using Active Directory

‘Exotic’ command and control (C2) channels always interest me. As defenses start to get more sophisticated, standard channels that have been stealthy before (like DNS) may start to lose their efficacy. I’m always on the lookout for non-obvious, one-way (or ideally two-way) communication methods. This post will cover a proof of concept for an internal C2 approach that uses standard Active Directory object properties in a default domain setup. Active Directory Property Sets This dawned on me when reviewing access control list entry information during training prep. In a default domain setup, there is a set of ACLs for user objects that apply to the user itself, defined…

PowerShell RC4

Every language needs an RC4 implementation. Despite its insecurities, RC4 is widely used due to its simple algorithm and the minimal amount of code it takes to implement it. Some people have even tried to fit implementations into single tweets. It’s commonly used by malware due to its low overhead, and I’m actually shocked that RosettaCode doesn’t have an entry for RC4. The only PowerShell implementation I’m aware of is Remko Weijnen’s code here, and as far as I know .NET doesn’t include an RC4 implementation that we can take advantage of. This post will cover a ‘proper’-(esque) implementation of RC4, a practical ‘minimized’…

KeeThief – A Case Study in Attacking KeePass Part 2

Note: this post and code were co-written with my fellow ATD workmate Lee Christensen (@tifkin_) who developed several of the interesting components of the project. The other week I published the “A Case Study in Attacking KeePass” post detailing a few notes on how to operationally “attack” KeePass installations. This generated an unexpected amount of responses, most good, but a few negative and dismissive. Some comments centered around the mentality of “if an attacker has code execution on your system you’re screwed already so who cares“. Our counterpoint to this is that protecting your computer from malicious compromise is a very…