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harmj0y Posts

PowerUp: A Usage Guide

Note: this topic was cross-posted on the official Veris Group blog. PowerUp is the result of wanting a clean way to audit client systems for common Windows privilege escalation vectors. It utilizes various service abuse checks, .dll hijacking opportunities, registry checks, and more to enumerate common ways that you might be able to elevate on a target system. We’ve gotten the chance to test PowerUp in multiple environments, as well integrate public feedback, so I wanted to put together a quick usage guide for those wanting to check it out. To load up PowerUp, first download the raw script to a local location, and then launch Powershell: C:>…

File Server Triage on Red Team Engagements

Note: this topic was cross-posted on the official Veris Group blog One common activity performed during red team assessments is data pilfering of compromised servers, particularly file servers. These systems can host an incredible amount of useful information and often the target data you’re after. However, the triage of a machine with literally millions of files can be an incredibly time consuming process. Examining the innumerable number of files, folders, and shares is how some red teams break their new members over a span of days, weeks, and months. This post will cover a few techniques to hopefully help you find what you’re looking for when…

Pwnstaller 1.0

Edit: a presentation on Pwnstaller 1.0 was given BSides Boston ’14- the slides are posted here and the video of the talk is here. This topic was also cross-posted on the official Veris Group blog. Pyinstaller, for those of you who aren’t aware, is a useful program that “converts (packages) Python programs into stand-alone executables”. This is great for the distribution of Python-based projects, as a developer doesn’t have to rely on Python already being installed on a user’s system. A few years ago, the security community started to realize that Pyinstaller could be repurposed to distribute malicious binaries during pentests. Debasish Mandal’s post describes how…

PowerUp v1.1 – Beyond Service Abuse

Edit: I gave a short firetalk on PowerUp at BSidesBoston 2014– the slides are posted here. The public reaction for PowerUp has been awesome and unexpected. I wanted to expand the script to move beyond just vulnerable service abuse, and include several other Windows privilege escalation vectors. There is a ton of great information out there on a variety of privesc techniques, and I drew from what I could find to implement the new functionality in PowerUp. I highly recommend checking out FuzzySecurity’s awesome post on the subject, as well as checking out @mubix‘s and @carnal0wnage‘s presentation “AT is the new Black”.…

PowerUp

On a recent assessment we ran into a situation where we needed to escalate privileges on a fairly locked down workstation. Kernel exploits (kitrap0d) wouldn’t work, so we fell back to an old classic, vulnerable windows services. While we couldn’t manipulate services directly, a custom system service purposely left its binary privileges open for compatibility purposes. tldr; replacing the service binary path with a custom binary (that created a user and added them to the local administrators) and then rebooting the box did the job nicely. Our process was more or less manual: reviewing all currently running Windows services and…

Cracking the Perimeter (CTP) and OSCE review

Exactly a year ago I went through the Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP) exam, the 24 hour capstone to the comprehensive and awesome Penetesting with Backtrack (now Pentesting with Kali Linux) training offered by the guys Offensive Security. I can’t say enough good things about that set of training and the exam itself; it’s a de facto requirement at my company that technical testers get their OSCP. A few months ago, I completed the follow-up training course, Cracking the Perimeter, and just finished the exam this past weekend. The OSCE functions as an ‘intermediate’ certification in between the OSCP and…